Science Experiments With Water

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We’ve been staying busy learning new things this summer so when school starts back up in a couple of weeks, the boys will be going into second grade with a few science experiments (or as they call them science experiences) to share with their classmates.  This week we worked on water experiments.  We had so much fun with our experiments we wanted to share them so that others could have some fun while learning too.  Besides learning there is lots of play going on over there – Tons of ideas for both boys an

Our first experiment showed the boys that two forms of matter could not occupy the same space at the same time.

What you need:

EXPERIMENT 1-1 wm

Clear Jar – Marbles (or stones) – Water – Masking Tape

How to do it:

EXPERIMENT 1 POURING WATER wm

Fill your jar (or glass) about 1/2 full with water.

EXPERIMENT 1 - TAPING JAR WM

Place a piece of masking tape on the jar to show the level of the water.

Carefully add your marbles (or stones) to the jar and watch what happens as you add them one at a time.

EXPERIMENT 1 - WATER RISE wm

Why does it happen:

Water and marbles are both matter.  Matter cannot share the same space at the same time.  Since the marbles are heavier than water, they will move to the bottom of the jar causing the water to rise above the tape mark as it gets out of the way of the marbles.

Our next experiment showed the boys how pressure affected the flow of liquid.

What you need:

experiment 2 tools wmEmpty can – Hammer and Nail  – Freezer Tape – Water

How to do it:

EXPERIMENT 2 - NAIL HOLES wmUse the hammer and nail and punch eight holes evenly around the can about 1 1/2 inches from the bottom and punch 4 holes 1/2. – 3/4″ from the first row.

EXPERIMENT 2 - NAILED HOLES wm

Take the freezer tape and cover up the two rows of holes.

EXPERIMENT 2 - TAPED HOLES wm

Fill the can with water.  You will need to be outside, over a sink or tub or some other container to catch the water as your rip the tape off quickly.

EXPERIMENT 2 - WATER OUT wm

Which row of holes has the fastest flowing water?  Which row is flowing out the farthest?

Why does I happen:

The water flowing from the bottom holes is under more pressure than the holes above it.  The weight of the water causes the water flowing from the bottom holes to move faster and farther.

We completed another experiment about pressure but this time using different size cans.

What you need:

EXPERIMENT 3 - TOOLSwmOne tall can – One short with a larger circumference – Hammer and Nail – Freezer Tape – Water

How to do it:

EXPERIMENT 3 - NAIL HOLES wm

EXPERIMENT 3 - TAPED HOLES wm

Use the hammer and nail to make a hole about 1/2 – 3/4″ from the bottom of each can and tape the holes with the freezer tape.  It is important that the size of the holes are the same.  Completely fill each can with water.  Again, you will need to conduct this experiment over something to collect the flowing water.

EXPERIMENT 4 - WATER OUT wm

Once both cans are on the edge of your container, remove the tape from both cans.  Which can has the longest stream of water leaving it?

Why does it happen:

Both cans could possibly hold the same amount of water but the water in the taller – thinner can is under more pressure than the rounder can.  The heavier the water, the faster and further the water will travel out of the can.

For our next experiment we used water and ice.

Grady & Sterling (like their Dad) love fishing.  Although our lakes and pond never freeze here in Texas they were curious what happens to fish when the pond does freeze.

What you need:

what you need

Water – Clear Jar – Ice Cubes

How to do it:

Fill a clear jar 3/4 full of water.  Drop ice cubes into the jar until the top of the water is covered in ice.

EXPERIMENT 4 - ICE IN wm

Why does it happen:

The ice cubes float at the top of the water.  When water molecules freeze, they expand and spread out across the body of water.  Ice (frozen water) is lighter than water so it floats on top.  When the top turns to ice, it prevents the water below it from freezing.  Letting the fish continuing to swim around.

Our last experiment seems to be every little boy’s favorite.  (I know it was their daddy’s favorite too)  Let’s Build A Tornado.

What you need:

TORNADO SUPPLIES wm

Water – Large Clear Jar (w/lid) – Vinegar – Liquid Soap – 2 Pennies

What you do:

Fill the jar 3/4 of the way with water.  Add a teaspoon of liquid soap and a teaspoon of vinegar.  Secure the lid and shake the jar to mix all the ingredients together.  Swirl the jar in a circular motion and you will create a small tornado.

Hope you enjoyed the experiments as much as the boys did.  What surprised me is that when they left grandma’s and went back home, they still remembered not only the fun they had, but the why of the experiments.

 

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